Rabbit Book List & Reviews

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Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Thea Bobbin Roo on Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:00 am

I thought we could start a thread (sticky?) with a list of rabbit related books and our reviews on them Very Happy At the end of your list you could put books you are interested in getting to see if anyone else has them and whether they would recommend them to others.

I'll start Smile

Rabbits for Dummies
Link 5/5
A very good well rounded rabbit information and care book. Easy to read layout and good for quick reference. American, so many things in the contacts and breeds sections are either irrelevant or not so useful. Covers the most common illnesses and has some good information on Myxomatosis despite it being American.

Overall a really good book both for the beginner and more experienced. Nice one to have on the shelf.


Rabbitlopaedia
Link 2/5
Quite a disappointing book. I found much of the information to be incorrect dispite reading it when I was very new to rabbit care. 90% of the information is good but knowing that some is completely incorrect makes you nervous to trust the rest of it. A real shame. There was also too much emphasis on breeding and the fur trade for my tastes. Some of the history on rabbits and how they came to be domesticated was interesting.

By all means read this book, borrow it from the library but I don't recommend it as one to use for reference.


House Rabbit Handbook: How to Live with an Urban Rabbit
Link 5/5
A very informative guide for house rabbit owners, but by no means does it exclude outdoor bunnies. Some history on the American house rabbit movement and why rabbits make good house pets. Good health and care information and some lovely stories about house bunnies. Lots of emphasis is put on how you can help your rabbit be happy and content and not just your average health and care advice, includes bunny proofing!

Highly recommended.


The Relaxed Rabbit: Massage for your Pet Bunny
Link 4/5
A lovely little insightful book into massage for bunnies! Lots of black and white photos, although it's a shame that the print is not great quality. It's a thin book but and very enjoyable read and fun to try and put the tips into practice.


The Rabbit: Perfect Guide to Caring for Your Rabbit (DVD)
Link 3/5
Mildly disappointing. A short DVD with a easy to use menu system with various aspects of rabbit care. Not informative for the experienced keeper, but perhaps a useful first guide for older children.


I am waiting for Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits: Inspirational Stories of Rescue, Triumph, and Joy which should be arriving in the post any day now Smile


I am interested in the following:

Why Does My Rabbit...?
Living with a House Rabbit
The Homoeopathic Treatment of Small Animals: Principles and Practice
When Your Rabbit Needs Special Care: Traditional and Alternative Healing Methods
Diseases of Domestic Rabbits
Rabbit Health in the 21st Century Second Edition:A Guide for Bunny Parents
Notes on Rabbit Internal Medicine
The Rabbit Whisperer Very Happy
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Lagomorph on Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:12 am

Living With A House Rabbit is excellent. I'll look at doing a review tomorrow.

Neil
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Laura on Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:51 am

I heard that Why Does My Rabbit is good, it's on my birthday wish list so *fingers crossed* someone loves me enough to buy it for me! *pokes ryan*
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Vickie on Sat Jul 12, 2008 7:23 pm

Mark bought me 'Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits' and I'm reading it at the moment. I absolutely love it, some of the true stories are just amazing.

The Rabbit Whisperer on the other hand.....! Hmmm
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Jay on Sat Jul 12, 2008 8:07 pm

I have read:
Rabbits for Dummies: 5/5
I completely agree with Thea's review of this book. I bought it a long time before we got a bunny, and read and re-read it until I had taken it all in. There's a lot of information in there, most is relevant and the rest could be at some point. Each chapter is easy to read, simple and lays out the information in an esy to understand way.
One thing I was really impressed with was the gravity that it treats the ownership of a rabbit. It doesn't in any way try to present a happy fluffy experience, and if anything, was the book that made me have the most reservations of owning a bun, as it takes you through the journey of a buns life and deals with most (the obvious exception is EC) health problems, and gives sound practical help for them...it even gives tips for grieving your bunny.

I'd highly recommend it.

House Rabbit Handbook: How to live with an urban Rabbit5/5

An excellent read for all owners, with the emphasis on the house bunny's needs.
The book isn't in chapters, but mainly in 2 page sections, which makes it incredibly easy to read, and you can just pick it up and get some instant info! Contrary to Rabbits for Dummies, this book has a more relaxed feel about it, and encourages you to learn more about the individuality of your bun through suggested play, toys and accommodation and diet etc. The information is concise and very relevant, and opens up more options for your bunny. It deals with convalescent care, and disbilities, which can happen as your bun gets older. This book gave me the inspiration to discover my bunnies individuality, and to make living in the home with us an inclusive experience for him.
It also has some hillarious photos in it!

The Rabbit whisperer1/5
This was the third book I got, so I'd already read the two above and so I was disappointed. Having read about Ingrid Tarrents bunny keeping for many years, I really hoped for something more. The Title is misleading, and suggests that you will learn some new secret skill to aid your bunnies happiness and communication with you. This is untrue. The book is a fair beginners guide to keeping rabbits, but is very generalised, and to be honest, I felt it was plagurised form the other two books I'd read. Whilst i doubt this is anywhere near the truth, the information given is just dilute and put into bite sized chunks. eg, the section on 'How to talk to your rabbit'...which excites you as you think this is why you bought the book, gives a small paragraph on each of the noises a rabbit makes, and offers a potential interpretation, but at no point does it suggest a way for you to communicate back, so I didn't learn how to talk to my rabbit, and it was all over in 1 &1/2 pages.
The most naff bit is that she peppers her celebrity friends through the book with their bunny keeping tales...Andrew Castle for example, who talks about the rabbits his kids had when they were little, but they didn't get any more....

As a complete novices book, you will learn something about general care, but I wouldn't recommend it as a serious guide to bunny welfare or communication

Great thread Thea, I look forward to reading more reviews, as I want to get another book

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Thea Bobbin Roo on Sat Jul 12, 2008 11:25 pm

Excellent reviews Jay Thumbs Up

Funnily enough I bought both Rabbits for Dummies and the House Rabbit Hand book before getting a bun too, and yes, I agree that the Dummies book really does not pink-tint rabbit keeping. It would be an excellent book to point possible new keepers to. After I had read it I was skeptical about whether I had made the right decision in reserving Bobbin Shocked But I didn't change my mind, was just glad that I had got my hands on such a good book, and it helped me prepare all the necessary requirements before bringing him home Smile
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by happy hopping on Sat Aug 02, 2008 10:24 pm



I recommend all of the above 4 books, they were recommend to me by my vet, and he's the dept. head of rabbit of literally the whole city

In particular, I highly recommend:

1) The 5 minute Veterinary Consult: Ferret & Rabbits by Barbara Oglesbee

In this book, it covers all sickness on rabbits, then the symptoms, then the medicine needed for that particular cure

I would like to give an e.g. of how powerful this book is:

In all types of the rabbit sickness, this book covers the definition, the diagnosis, the treatment and the medications use

For ref.:

PO = Per os
IV = intravenous
SC = Subcutaneous
IM = Intramuscular

Below is an e.g. of the the definition, the diagnosis, the treatment and the medications use on GI stasis. (The forum software cut off the right side of the JPG, so the 3rd column is cut off, click the link below to view the entire text)

For original text:

After you click the link, you have to click the "magnifying len" symbol on your browser to view the text clearly.

http://img515.imageshack.us/img515/7672/gistasis1qr4.jpg

http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/8997/gistasis2bb2.jpg

http://img372.imageshack.us/img372/9297/gistasis3np7.jpg

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/6203/gistasis4scanvz4.jpg







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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Maizy on Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:01 am

Homeopathic treatment of small animals is a good reference source. It lists out symptoms and specific diseases, covers a short area of materia medica ( a very popular area for me) and has a good glossary of terms. I have seen and used better books, but for the cost it's worthy of a place on your bookshelf.

Also Rabbit health in the 21st Century. An absolute breath of fresh air. It's been great to read an up to date modern day thinking book regarding rabbit care. Tops the dated Rabbitlopeadia by miles and if there is a down side, it is only that it is American, so it contains references to meds such as Bicillin, which is not licensed ( yet) here in the UK. However, the source references are reliable, factual and relevant and themselves form a valuable resource. If you buy only one bunny book this year, make it this one.

Interested in :
When your Rabbit needs Special Care
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by racheld69 on Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:12 pm

just ordered a few of these so thanks for the reviews!
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Jay on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:13 pm

'Living with a Houserabbit'

By Linda Dykes & Helen Flack




Reviewed by Jay

Linda Dykes and Helen Flack are both founders of the UK Rabbit Welfare Association, formerly the British Houserabbit Association, and were pioneers for setting the standards that are now commonplace for rabbit care and welfare in the UK

Their book, ‘Living with a Houserabbit’ was first published on 2003, when the concept of houserabbits was very much in it’s infancy, as indeed was the idea that rabbits had any care and welfare needs. Things have moved on enormously since their intervention and publication, but still their book stands the test of time, with valuable information that is as relevant today as when it was first published. Most of the information we have about rabbit care and welfare is because of this book, and the research and experience of its authors.

The book is divided into twelve easily readable and digestible chapters, covering the history of the rabbit, owner's responsibilities in regard to its care and it’s environmental, behavioral and social needs. A comprehensive health care guide, written in consultation with Owen Davies BVSc, MRCVS, concludes the book. The book is hugely enhanced with some wonderful photographs that clearly demonstrate the written points, and the information given is well researched and obviously gleamed from a variety of experiences. Much of the content could easily be applied to outdoor rabbits as well. Unlike other rabbit care books, the information provided is simple; it advises how to look after rabbits with the minimum of fuss. Rabbits may be complex, but they are not complicated animals, their needs are quite simple, but they offer potential to develop further. Living with a Houserabbit could not be a better book for a new houserabbit owner.

The first three short chapters start with an interesting history of the wild rabbit, its natural behaviours, its domestication and its place in our modern home. ‘Is a rabbit for me?‘ is possibly one of the most unasked questions when considering acquiring a rabbit – rabbits are far more complex than many impulsive buyers realise, and this chapter enlightens the reader as to the many changes that will have to be made to their home prior to sharing it with a rabbit or two. It offers good advice on a variety of options, including living partly indoors and partly outdoors. The emphasis is on the flexibility of rabbits and their ability to adapt to most environments. Considerations like other pets, allergies, cost and accommodation are succinctly and adequately covered.

The short chapter on preparing for your houserabbit’s arrival emphasises the need to protect your rabbit(s) from the things in your home that are dangerous – cables, plants, furnishings, etc., and how to minimize damage from an animal that is born to chew. The section on different types of accommodation and stimulation is simple, and easy to implement. The next three chapters cover the first few days of your rabbit’s stay, followed by a very thorough care guide, and concludes with a healthy eating plan – all of which are imperative to a rabbit’s mental and physical health and well-being. The information on the first few days is really pivotal to the relationship you and your new rabbit(s) will have, and the chapter guides your actions and explains what your rabbit is doing and experiencing at the same time. As a prey animal, it can be easy to frighten rabbits, and the gentle approach advised here, with patience and observation, will reduce the stress that your rabbit(s) experience from their new environment.


‘Caring for your houserabbit’ is one of the most succinct yet exhaustive guides I have read. So much attention has been given to the writing of this book that a few words contain so much value. The topics covered are now fairly universal, however in 2003, when the book was published, a lot of them would have been unheard of. The thing that sets this care section aside from others is the amazing photographs that accompany it, all of which pertinently and effectively demonstrate the information provided, as well as any video could.
The chapter on healthy eating addresses the importance of a correct diet by explaining the complicated process of rabbit digestion, and the relevance of particular foods to that diet. Health problems, such as obesity, created by a poor or inadequate diet are also given concise explanations and your role in preventing them is emphasised.

The following three chapters deal in great depth with the psychology of your rabbit(s) in relation to their happiness, their needs and their relationship with you, their keeper.

'Rabbit behaviour’ eloquently describes how your rabbit(s) communicate with you, and with each other, through postures, ear positions, and occasional vocalisations. The authors then go on to explain possibly the biggest challenge to a houserabbit owner given the destructive animal that is a young houserabbit, and offers remedies, preventative measures and alternatives to limit the damage. This is important information, as many houserabbits can end up in rescue because of their gnawing tendencies. ‘Training & troubleshooting’ deals with the common problems that houserabbits can present, and how to train your rabbit(s) with positive reinforcement, to live more happily in your home. Underpinning this is the understanding of why your rabbit behaves in the ways it does and what it responds to, with a view to changing its behaviour. The chapter presents some testimonials from owners who have been through the process, and who share their own stories, mistakes and successes.

‘The social animal’ explores the potential for the different relationships your rabbit(s) will form with each other, you, your children and other pets and how to make these work. In doing so, you reduce the potential for stress and harm that these relationships can bring. There are some beautiful pictures of rabbits living in harmony with cats and dogs, and I learned that cats and rabbits communicate in a similar way. The chapter also discusses how to introduce different species to your rabbit(s) and also has some personal testimonials.

The small chapter, ‘Fun time’ opens new doors to expand your knowledge and connections in a variety of ways, through the internet, showing, breeding, rescuing fostering and even discusses using rabbits for therapy.

The book concludes with two chapters on health and illness – written in consultation with Owen Davies BVSc, MRCVS – which cover the majority of common ailments that bunny owners are likely to encounter. Topics that are rarely covered in other books of this kind are the importance of getting the right vet, and how to get the most from your relationship with them. Basic home care is broad, and covers a variety of common procedures from syringing, post operative and nursing care, and administering medication. The chapter ends with a sensitive and educated approach to the end of your rabbit’s life and the options you have about euthanasia.

Finally, the ‘Nose-to-Tail health guide’ is exactly that. It starts at the nose and moves through the body, explaining the various health conditions that your rabbit is susceptible to. Each part of the body has its own warning signs, and is followed by explanations of their possible problems. Given that rabbits can become very ill very quickly, this is perhaps the most important section in the book for a novice owner; it is thorough, informative, and simple to understand.

Summary
For indoor or outdoor rabbits, 'Living with a Houserabbit' is so considerately written that whilst it is more relevant to houserabbit care, there is plenty of good quality and relevant information for all rabbit owners. Living with a houserabbit, especially a young one can be very difficult if not managed well, and the book gives relevant emphasis to the most common problems and offers a wide scope of preventative measures that will also help your relationship with your rabbit(s), as well as protecting your home. A novice rabbit owner will be armed with as much information as they need to embark on the somewhat unpredictable journey of houserabbit care, and the more experienced owner will certainly learn something from the book. Every piece of information is relevant and packed succinctly into a thoroughly enjoyable read!

This review was originally published in Hopping Mad! Bunny Magazine - June 2011. The original can be viewed HERE
Produced for Hopping Mad! bunny magazine - Copyright © HappyHoppers Forums UK - June 2011 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Last edited by Jay on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:18 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Jay on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:17 pm



Reviewed by Katie B

I don’t know about you, but I am always trying to see the world from my buns point of view. What I forget though is that he is not a naughty little boy in a bunny suit. I look at his behaviour, his expressions and his demands and try to work out why he does what he does, as if he were a human.

Reading this delightful book I have learned, laughed and rediscovered that my boy is a most clever, unique, fascinating and magnificent creature, he is in fact, a rabbit!

The first part of the book is concerned with what actually makes a rabbit; the history of the wild and domestic rabbit and how our domestication of the rabbit has changed them is comprehensively explained. The results being both fascinating and surprising!

Did you know the rabbit originates from Spain and Portugal, and that Spain, or “Espania”, was actually named after the Rabbit? You didn’t? Ok, a brief explanation…When the Phonecians discovered Spain in 1100, they called it ‘i-shepham-im’, which means ‘Land of the Hyrax’ - the Hyrax being a native animal to their own country that closest resembled this strange animal. When i-shepham-im is translated into Latin, it becomes ‘Hispania’ of which the English form is Spain!

Did you know that all breeds of domestic rabbit are descended from this single species of the rabbit family?

Dr McBride’s book explains that while some buns may look a species apart from their wild cousins, behaviourally they are the same, and as such enlightens us as to how we need to understand the behaviour of the wild rabbit in order to understand the behaviour of the little friend(s) in our lives. There are behavioural differences between breeds, it is true, but as the author so brilliantly explains, this is due to the altered physical attributes they live with rather than the domestication itself.

As we know, the rabbit is a prey animal and this book portrays in a fascinating way, how this battle for survival influences the rabbits’ unique physiological and behavioural make up in ways you will never have known about or thought of.

Did you know that in the wild a single doe can produce 30 young in a good year! While I knew the rabbit was an expert builder I was impressed that they are also excellent engineers ! Warren construction includes emergency exits, passing points, and other rooms. A warren covering 100 Square meters can have as many as 50 exits! I was completely surprised to discover that the rabbit is completely unique in the rearing of its young – want to know how? Well I’m not going to spoil it for you! You will need to read the book to find out. I found this part of the book to be a mix of light hearted telling of a tale, to sections that had more academic qualities, and I can see how this book would also be a valuable reference for a student wishing to progress with academic studies in animal behaviour, or an owner keen to learn more in depth knowledge..

The second part of the book investigates specific elements to a rabbit's behaviour in the form of an A-Z. If you thought that you knew everything you could about your pet rabbit then think again! This part of the book took me from revelation to revelation and I was unable to put it down! The explanations are dotted with the most wonderful examples of how rabbit behaviour is affected by both our expectations of them and of the conditions in which they live. These take the form of actual letters received by the author from concerned, loving owners who want to better understand their buns.

Not only are these mini case studies packed with endearing and often funny tales, but they are an education in how to relate to our rabbits. I particularly loved the case of Tustle, a house bun with a passion for laundry theft, and Willow, the expert re-decorator. Although in some cases the behaviour was extreme, I have related elements of my own buns behaviour in some of these examples and this has made me smile and realise that actually, I haven’t got him trained at all! All this time, it is me that has been undergoing the training and he has me exactly where he wants me!

In places the age of this book is telling, such as references to rabbits living with Guinea Pigs, which we know is now a slightly out dated school of thought. There are also references to getting baby buns from breeders, whereas nowadays pet shops, garden centres and rescue organisations are a popular option for many people. This however, is only due to the age of the book, and does not in any way take away the importance or enjoyability of the book as well as the undoubted expertise with which it is written.

So whether you are new to the world of rabbits or are an old hand, there is something in here for everyone. You will be surprised and delighted, and you will learn things you didn’t know before. As a result your bun will love you for your better understanding of his inner wildie!

This article was first published in 'Hopping Mad! Bunny Magazine' - October 2011. The original can be viewed HERE

Produced for Hopping Mad! Bunny Magazine Copyright © Happy Hoppers Forums Uk - October 2011 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Jay on Thu Nov 17, 2011 4:26 pm

Rabbits or Dummies - 1st Edition

Audrey Pavia




Reviewed by Jay

N.B. There are 2 now two editions of 'Rabbits for Dummies'. This review is of the first edition, which is now available at a reduced rate which makes it exceptional value for money.

There are a plethora of rabbit care books that give very sound advice on their subject, but are prone to either dressing up the experience as something that can only be good for rabbits and their owners, or else fail to address, with nearly enough gravity, just how complex rabbits can be to keep and care for. The vast array of challenges to rabbit health is usually the reserve of specialist medical guides, which are not the first books your average rabbit owner will reach for.

The ‘Dummies Guide’ series of books are a well established, niche and very successful brand, largely due to their superb editing, lay out, and their ability to convey vast amounts of quality information in manner that is incredibly easy to read. ‘Rabbits for Dummies’ is no exception. Comprehensively written by Audrey Pavia (who also wrote ‘Horses for Dummies’), this book addresses the serious responsibility of rabbit ownership, and would be a great asset to rescue organisations if made compulsory reading for prospective owners, as the work leaves you with no doubt as to the time, money and dedication needed to care for these animals.

The book consists of five parts, each containing relevant chapters. On the left margin of each page there are bullet points: ‘tip’, ‘warning’, and ‘remember’, drawing attention to the most important points on each page. The layout of the book makes it simple to read, either in depth or just for browsing, making it very easy to digest each subject. The book is written in American-English, and does contain some cultural differences in approach and description, some of which may not be instantly familiar, but nonetheless, the content is readily approachable. There are, in the first edition, 270 pages of well researched information and clearly written advice.

Part 1: ‘Bringing on the Bunny Basics’. The book opens by demanding the reader question their motives, ability and time for taking on a rabbit, asking crucial questions like: “Do I have at least three hours of free time a day?”, “Am I willing to alter my lifestyle?” and “Do I have enough money to set up and sustain my rabbit?”. Each of the questions raised are well considered and contain additional advice, giving everything you need to know before you learn about the needs of rabbits in relation to their physiology, anatomy, and psychology.

Audrey Pavia writes without bias, and this section contains a comprehensive guide to rabbit breeds, as well as discussing the pros and cons of buying from a breeder, rescuing, and pet-shop purchasing. Once you have decided that a rabbit is the pet for you, the author then gives very sound advice about the range of choices that you have, and they’re quite daunting – Boy or girl? One or more? Breed, coat type, markings, etc., are all given ample consideration. The section on buying from a breeder is impressive and balanced by good information on rescuing, strays, classifieds and pet-shop purchases.


Part 2: ‘Keeping your rabbit well fed and funk free’. This part looks at the practicalities and choices, and provides a comprehensive list of what you’ll need. The chapters on accommodation are informative, and cover all options for both indoor and outdoor living, again, with a sense of gravity and responsibility for the choices made. The author leaves you in no doubt that having a house rabbit is possibly the most destructive thing for home belongings, whilst offering very good tips and advice on reducing and managing the impact.

Outdoor accommodation advice is generally good, with a strong emphasis on providing as much space as possible and reasons to do so. You will read cultural differences here, and advice regarding hutch flooring differs to the UK, as it is common practice in the USA to use wire mesh. The author does explain about the risk of sore hocks from this design, and whilst she discusses toilet training for indoor rabbits, this is not considered for outdoor rabbits.

The information on protecting your rabbit from predators, harsh environments and poisonous plants by choosing the correct and safe location, addresses many points that could be so easily overlooked.

Dietary advice is good and stresses the importance of getting it right, and the consequences of getting it wrong. It also reminds us that our pet rabbit has the same dietary needs as their wild cousins, and should not be given inappropriate foods that they are not designed to digest. This is supported by lists of safe foods, (market bought and wild), and poisonous ones. While the lists are limited, they will be good for a novice.

This section also covers the day to day care and grooming of your rabbit and explains why rabbits are ‘exotic’, plus what you should expect from your vet in relation to this aspect. There then follows a lengthy health section that addresses common and serious health problems, prevention, treatment and vaccinations. The obvious exception in this section is Encephalitozoon Cuniculi (E. Cuniculi), although the author does discuss head tilt as a health issue, this is not offered as a possibility. Whilst E. Cuniculi is complex and its treatment is controversial, I found this omission a puzzling one, however, the information in this section alone is enough to put legitimate and worthwhile doubts into the mind of any a prospective rabbit owner.

Part 3: ‘Holing up with your companion’. starts with a very clearly written psychological assessment of rabbits and offers plenty of help for you to interact with and stimulate your rabbit’s intelligence through understanding their mental needs and welfare, and working with that. The section on training acknowledges that is not just something for fun, but benefits your rabbit’s mental welfare. It covers toilet training, recall and tricks, amongst other things.

The author always provides balance, and in this chapter, she also discusses behavioural problems, and the owner’s role in such issues, as part of both the problem and solution. Biting, aggression, bossiness, digging, kicking, urinating, etc., are all given explanations with helpful suggestions to assist your bunny to overcome these problems. Considering that it is many of these troubles that lead to rabbits being re-homed, the advice given is good and addresses many of the common challenges that rabbits present, and how to overcome them, including neutering.

You’ll also find quality information on breeding, and Ms Pavia treats this with the deep consideration it requires. “The reality”, she writes, “is that breeding is a serious, time-consuming activity with practical and moral issues to consider before you embark”. The following pages cover health, pregnancy and baby rabbit care, as well as addressing the many problems that can arise from breeding with, or without experience, and is immediately followed by a chapter on ‘Saying goodbye’, which discusses difficult choices that may have to be made in relation to the end of your rabbit’s life. There are a couple of pages on dealing with grief, and getting support over this time, all of which add to the serious atmosphere of the book, and the expectation that if done to the best of your ability, the relationship with your bunny will have a greater impact on you than you may ever have thought possible.

Part 4: ‘Enjoying your fun bunny’. From toys to interactive fun, this section initially focuses on why your rabbit needs stimulation, and the consequences of boredom, before suggesting some fairly standard, but useful tips on keeping your rabbit busy. Suggested toys are economical, and largely home-made.

The issue of traveling with your rabbit is covered in depth, and discusses preparatory needs, suggested carriers, accommodation and hiring a pet sitter.

The last chapter in this section discusses applying your rabbit knowledge to a wider community, being pro-active and joining up with like-minded people, through communities, societies, shows and events. The latter has important information for you to consider in terms of your rabbit’s health and welfare, should this appeal to you. I’m particularly impressed that the author stimulates these considerations throughout the book. It is easy to get caught along with the idea that your rabbit can be fun and do anything, when this is often untrue. As prey animals, many of these experiences are frightening to some rabbits, and their individual personalities need to assessed and taken into account. The author discusses these events and what to expect.

Part 5: ‘Part of Tens’. The first part covers medical emergencies, and when to see a vet, with some, but not much, supporting information about the conditions. The obvious omissions here are Flystrike. or Botfly attack and the onset symptoms of Myxomatosis. Although this is covered in an earlier section, it is not seen as an emergency. This is easily explained as North American rabbits rarely contract the full symptoms of the deadly Myxomatosis virus, and are far more likely to present the less serious form, ‘Nodular Myxomatosis’.*

The second part of this section lists 10 websites that the author suggests will be beneficial. They are well-known sites, and will be, in the main, useful to a novice.
The Appendix lists various organisations, publications, supply outlets, travel guides and breeders associations. Most of these are based in the USA.

Summary
This was the first rabbit care book I read, some weeks prior to collecting my first rabbit. It stopped me in my tracks, as the realisation of what I was embarking on really hit home. I read it a few times and it prompted me by a couple more books before making the decision. In this respect it was invaluable, and I would recommend it to any prospective novice owner. Most of the information is practical and helpful, and Ms Pavia raises the bar to what we think a rabbit is capable of and the significance of your role in its health and mental welfare. It took some time for my first rabbit to blossom, but with perseverance we got there together, and this book played a important part in that. As a general bite size guide, it ticks a lot of boxes, and there are specialist books that explore many of the topics covered in greater depth. As its title suggests, this is clearly for novices, and as such, it fills that remit abundantly, by providing a vast amount of information in rabbit care and welfare, thoroughly, comprehensively, and in a language that is clear and easy to grasp.

Who is this book for ?
Rabbits for Dummies is not written for children, it addresses rabbit care and welfare with the mature and responsible approach it warrants. Adults and over 12's would benefit from reading it, preferably before bringing a bunny home. It would, however, make excellent material to read with children, as the selected snippets of information and pictures make the book easy to digest and visually appealing!

This article was first published in 'Hopping Mad! Bunny Magazine' - October 2011. The original can be viewed HERE

Produced for Hopping Mad! Bunny Magazine Copyright © Happy Hoppers Forums Uk - October 2011 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Tuckerbunnies on Thu Nov 17, 2011 7:18 pm

I've loads of Bunny books but here's some of them....

Brilliant book and to me a 'must have' it's a guide to the care and behaviour of rabbits with special needs and (When your Rabbit needs special care' traditional & Alternative Healing Methods) and it's written by Lucille C. Moore & Kathy Smith.

Another good book full of useful information and a book everyone with a houserabbit should have as it covers everything from preparing for your houserabbit, caring for it, healthy eating, rabbit behaviour, training and troubleshooting and health guide ( Living with a Houserabbit) written by Linda Dykes & Helen Flack.

this is one of my favourite book's and is well been used time and time again for referance over the years. ( HouseRabbit Handbook How to Live with an Urban Rabbit) by Marinell Harriman.

This is a brilliant little book written by a sanctuary worker to highlight the range of problems that both 'house rabbits' and 'garden rabbits' can create (so that some people can choose perhaps not to have a rabbit after all) and also to provide an abundance of practical humane welfare advice. (The Problem with Rabbits) compiled by Pat Rees.

Lovely lovely book with wonderful inspirational stories of rescue, Triumph and Joy. It's one of those book's that you can't put down. (Rabbits Gentle Hearts Valient Spirits) by Marie Mead with Nancy LaRoche.

This is not a book I would recommend as it's more for Breeder's but I didn't realise till I got it home , covers Breeding and commercial rabbit production and there are pictures in the book which I found upsetting, covers rabbit breeds and food and feeding also. ( Encyclopedia of Pet Rabbits) by David Robinson.

There are some lovely photos of lop bunnies in this book, it says about lop rabbits 'more affectionate than a cat, and less demanding and quieter than a dog' (don't think everyone would agree there! ) this is an old book so don't know if it's still in publication. (Lop Rabbits as Pets) by Sandy Crook.

I love this book so much as of course it's written by rabbit specialist and Vet Francis Harcourt-Brown and is full of very in-depth coverage of the health and disease of the domestic rabbit. My copy is very special to me as it has 'Best Wishes to Maysie' by francis H-Brown on the 26th January 2006

I have a credit in animal behaviour and so this book was of interest to me as it is written by Anne McBride who is a specialist in rabbit behaviour and it didn't let me down, I found it very interesting and a 'must have'. ( Why Does My Rabbit.....?) by Anne McBride.

This is my latest buy and I love it as not only has Tasmin written about common rabbit behaviour but has got lovely little drawings of rabbits to show you the different kinds of behaviour that are covered. (Understanding Your Rabbit's Habit's) Written by Tamsin Stone.

And I know it's not a rabbit but if anyone is like me and love's Hares and studies them .......

This is a lovely big book full of absolutely gorgeous photos of Hares and leverets. It's also the first major book on the hare for over 30 years. This book tells you about the history of the hare, covering it's behaviour throughout the seasons, it's courtship and breeding, it's favoured habitats and worldwide distribution, it's remarkable survival techniques, it's predators and it's hunters. A must for all the Hare lovers. ( The Hare) by Jill Mason.

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by c.bolduan on Mon Mar 10, 2014 1:04 pm

Years later.......
Rabbit for dummies is a good book that is looked at any time something seems wrong.
Love Celia Haddons 100 ways to a happy bunny. Makes me giggle
And ordered now the massage book, how to live with house bunnie and all for parsley.

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by Tuckerbunnies on Mon Mar 10, 2014 2:47 pm

Aww all my book photos  Sad  I had to clear a lot of stuff on my computer as I had limited memory and the book photos must have been among some I got rid of. Oh Sorry about that but at least everyone knows what the titles are.  Sad 

Rabbits for Dummies is very good  and the massage one is brilliant I have the CD and book on the massage and I use to massage Baby Saint a lot and she loved it, I did Floyd who was boarding with us the other day and he fell in such a deep sleep while I was doing it I had to wake him up when I finished.  Laughing

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by c.bolduan on Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:48 pm

Laughing Laughing Laughing 
Brilliant I have to do this at times when Bubbles has enjoyed her foot massage. So lovely if an animal is trusting you that much.
I'm just cruising through the older posts and hey what well done HH I find it helpful and entertaining Thumbs Up 

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by bunny boy on Fri Jan 30, 2015 11:04 pm

Thank you so much for all the postings on rabbit care, this has made making choices alot easyer, when I first started reading bunny books l found the
information contradictive( who do you believe) this has been a life saver Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
Hugs
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by nethie on Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:40 pm

Vickie wrote:Mark bought me and I'm reading it at the moment. I absolutely love it, some of the true stories are just amazing.

The Rabbit Whisperer on the other hand.....!  Hmmm


I know this is old thread but the book 'Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits' Is absolutely brilliant well worth buying
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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by c.bolduan on Mon Aug 03, 2015 9:47 pm

nethie wrote:
Vickie wrote:Mark bought me and I'm reading it at the moment. I absolutely love it, some of the true stories are just amazing.

The Rabbit Whisperer on the other hand.....!  Hmmm


I know this  is old thread but the book 'Rabbits: Gentle Hearts, Valiant Spirits'  Is absolutely brilliant well worth buying
I so agree!

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Re: Rabbit Book List & Reviews

Post by c.bolduan on Sat Aug 08, 2015 7:18 am

Just re reading Anne Mc. Brides book why does my rabbit.Thumbs UpVery Happy

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